The last stop on our mini Iceland South coast road trip was Vík, the Southernmost village with a population of just circa 290. Famous for it’s black sand beach Reynisfjara, which I had looked forward to seeing ever since I first thought about going to Iceland.

It was by far one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been. Volcanic basalt columns line the cliffs and extend from the sea, the basalt also giving the beach it’s black sand. When we went, it was a clear day and the moon was visible, making for a spectacular polar night sun set, the sky filled with vibrant purples and pinks for a short time before the sun began to set fully.

Reynisfjara

Vík is the southernmost village in Iceland, with a population of just circa 290. Vík lies directly beneath the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, under which Katla sits. An eruption from this huge volcano is long overdue and would melt the glacier, causing a huge flash flood. If the floods came in this direction, Vik would almost certainly be wiped out. It’s thought the only place which is safe is the church, so residents would evacuate there at the first sign of an eruption.

Vik is one of the few places in Iceland effected by volcanic ash during the 2010 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull.

Reynisfjara

Reynisfjara

The snow on the black sand looked completely unreal, this was like no beach I had ever seen before.

Reynisfjara

As we arrived the sun began to set, transforming the sky from it’s vivid blue colour.

Reynisfjara

Basalt columns line the cliffs and it’s caves.

Reynisfjara

And basalt structures protrude from the sea. This beach was by far the most other worldly feeling place I had ever been, it felt as though I had entered a scene from a fantasy film.

Reynisfjara

Reynisfjara

The sun set quickly, which we watched from the beach.

Reynisfjara

As the sun dipped below the horizon, the sky became a bright purple colour which was so surreal.

Reynisfjara

Vík lies directly beneath the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, under which Katla sits. An eruption from this huge volcano is long overdue and would melt the glacier, causing a huge flash flood. If the floods came in this direction, Vik would almost certainly be wiped out. It’s thought the only place which is safe is the church, so residents would evacuate there at the first sign of an eruption.

This post was written retrospectively in November 2016.